The INDependent republic of the bulge in the hallway

I was given a space between offices at Concordia University to create a temporary installation. I became interested in the politics of the space, which was mostly poised in relation to the tight studios my peers inhabited in the building. Extrapolating on the privilege of the opportunity I decided to create an independent state which I could call my own, one which would not only stand independent from the building but as well in relation to Canada. I studied the Montevideo Convetion of the Rights and Duties of States, which codifies a declared theory of statehood under international law. In looking up definitions within the convention, I attempted to understand the essentials of what being a state entailed. With that information I would adjust the installation in order to qualify it as a state under international law.

 

For example, article one within the convention declares that the state as a person of international law should possess a permanent population. Permanent means that something is lasting or intending to last or remain unchanged for a duration of time. Population is defined as all the inhabitants of a particular place. So permanent population is the lasting or intending to last or remain unchanged group of inhabitants in a particular place. An inhabitant is defined as a person or an animal that lives in or occupies a place. An animal is defined as a living organism that feeds on organic matter. So, as it pertains to this logic, article one of the convention declares that the state as a person of international law should possess a lasting or intending to last or remain unchanged person or living organism that feeds on organic matter. Therefore, in order to qualify my state, the Independent Republic of the Bulge in the Hallway acquired a cactus planted on compost. I continued along with the convention in this manner.